Method and madness

Method and madness – a tribute to Samuel Mockbee by Larry Rinder

“Most people think they have to choose between reality and fantasy. In a sense, the whole purpose of childhood is the slow and often painful separation of children from their dreams. And if that doesn’t work, there is always psychoanalysis later on. We strive for rationality, for a sense of order and purpose. We want to be able to discuss our goals in the clear light of day.

Our society makes some room for people who don’t want to leave their dreams behind, safely stored in sleep. They can be artists, writers, or musicians but not much else. Certainly nothing practical. We don’t want people who have trouble distinguishing images from things driving our buses, trimming our trees, or installing our phones. Plato came down hard on these types and we still do.

So imagine an architect, not just an architect but a community builder and an advocate for social change, whose work depended on an engine of fantasy. Who saw in his colleagues and clients embodiments of fantastical characters imbued with mythic purpose. Whose work in the world, celebrated as a model for progressive design, building and education, may have been simply the cast off foam from a vast imaginative sea.”

Escaping the secular practice of architecture, into a more pagan, feminine and connected way of creating spaces and social networks.

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This entry was published on January 25, 2013 at 3:22 pm. It’s filed under Architectural education, Observations & Remarks and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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